Rain garden missing

One of the projects we did not foresee the need for when we first moved into our home was a rain garden project.  Back in 2003 we were thinking about fruit trees, raised vegetable beds, deciduous vines, native trees, solar hot water and solar electricity. I wish we had thought of a rain garden too. At the end of our garden drive an accommodation building sits and just in front of it a storm water drain. On heavy rain days the water creates a channel down our drive from the top of the site and into the drain. Had we been more enlightened back then,  a rain garden would have been perched where the drain now sits and the entry door to our accommodation bungalow re positioned to allow access to it without compromising the positioning of a rain garden bed.

The best option for us know is to place a rain garden bed at the top of the site and try and capture some of the water before it makes its way down to the drain. For the moment however heavy rains take some of our precious top soil down to the drain and out to the creek which is a waste. Some of it gets trapped in the drain and over months of accumulation develops into a rich compost or humus like substance rich with worms. I clean out the drain and place the rich fertiliser in my garden beds.

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The slope towards the red door brings rain water down the site where it is directed into a drain. With more foresight, a rain garden could have been placed well before the door with a small raised path to ensure access.

The drain that sits just above the red door collects soil, water and organic matter.

The drain that sits just above the red door collects soil, water and organic matter.

The result is a rich humus full of worms for my garden.

The result is a rich humus full of worms for my garden.